Republican extremism

Large percentage of insurrectionists had "financial troubles"

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But efforts to make this a cause & effect are flawed:

Nearly 60 percent of the people facing charges related to the Capitol riot showed signs of prior money troubles, including bankruptcies, notices of eviction or foreclosure, bad debts, or unpaid taxes over the past two decades, according to a Washington Post analysis of public records for 125 defendants with sufficient information to detail their financial histories.

The group’s bankruptcy rate — 18 percent — was nearly twice as high as that of the American public, The Post found. A quarter of them had been sued for money owed to a creditor. And 1 in 5 of them faced losing their home at one point, according to court filings.

At the risk of coming off as "elitist," and with an acknowledgment that economic hardship is a reality that many Americans face each day, I categorically reject the "this is why they did it" explanation for attacking Congress:

Minority advocates worry Jan. 6 Insurrection will spawn laws that hurt them

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They always get the sharp end of the stick:

“The answer ought to be to sort of pause. Because the instinct to do something is something I’m really quite afraid of,” said Maya Berry, executive director of the Arab American Institute, one of more than 130 civil and human rights organizations that say the FBI already has the tools it needs.

“White violence is consistently perpetuated and then used as justification for increased surveillance or increased state power against communities of color,” said 26-year-old Iranian American activist Hoda Katebi, who is Muslim, wears a headscarf and grew up defending herself against harassment and being called a terrorist in the years after Sept. 11, 2001.

I consider myself a supporter of the 2nd Amendment, but our current gun laws are a big mess. And "Open Carry" is one of the worst ideas that has emerged from the gun culture, and the lawmakers who embrace this trend have no business holding elected office. It has only served two main purposes; to intimidate other citizens, and to "normalize" dangerous and misanthropic behavior in the public square. Law enforcement has become inured to the inherent danger of open carry in our society, which is (of course) one of the main goals of these groups. Back to the potential statutory backlash of the failed coup:

UNC Board of Governors crumbling under ideological discord

And big surprise, Tom Fetzer is right in the middle of it:

In a stunning and contentious session, a faction of the UNC Board of Governors moved Thursday for substantive changes in the university system, including lowering tuition and fees at the campuses, reorganizing the staff of UNC President Margaret Spellings and moving the UNC system headquarters out of Chapel Hill.

The meeting followed a scathing letter to Spellings and Board Chairman Lou Bissette that was reported by The News & Observer on Thursday. The Aug. 22 letter, signed by 15 members, took Spellings and Bissette to task for a lack of communication to the members before they sent a letter to Gov. Roy Cooper about security and plans for Silent Sam, the Confederate statue on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Some board members said they had never seen and wouldn’t have signed the letter written by new member Tom Fetzer.

If you find that second paragraph somewhat confusing, it doesn't mean your cognitive skills are waning. Two different letters are elevated to "subjects" in the narrative, making the letter referenced in the final sentence somewhat of a mystery. Tom Fetzer wrote the second letter, which is the first one mentioned in the paragraph. And he was complaining about the first letter written, which is the second one referenced in the paragraph. Does that help? Yeah, not so much. Basically this "renegade" group, which is apparently a majority of the Board, are pissed off they didn't get a chance to defend Silent Sam and/or accuse Roy Cooper of being the 2nd gunman on the grassy knoll in the letter Spellings sent to the Governor, and they feel it made them appear "weak." And it's that last part that should worry people the most, because if this vastly Republican body decides to really flex its muscles and make a show of power, the effects on the UNC System could be devastating. In addition to Fetzer, there are a couple more individuals who signed his letter that bear close watching:

The twisted mind of J. Peder Zane

The hate is strong with this one:

The righteous anger that poisons our national politics was turbocharged in Raleigh on June 15, 2010. That’s when protesters took over a meeting of the Wake County Board of Education, denouncing the duly elected board’s policies as “morally wrong.”

Their disruptive efforts continued through the summer, spawning the Moral Monday movement in North Carolina. Soon, the Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter movements erupted nationally.

What Zane doesn't tell his readers could fill volumes. That particular Board of Education meeting was the culmination of a long, racially-tinged "crusade" partially financed by Art Pope and Bob Luddy, to overturn policies put in place to reverse trends of poverty and inequality in mostly African-American neighborhoods, and to re-institute some bent "separate but still not equal" segregated school system. Oh no, he can't tell readers that, because it would provide a sound reason for the protest that took place. What's even more alarming about Zane's point of view is not the people he feels the need to denigrate, it's the people he's proud of:

I capitulate

For at least a year now, I have flirted with the notion of complete surrender to North Carolina's Republican juggernaut. Observing that most of my fellow citizens seem oblivious to the growing danger of right-wing extremism, I have imagined that our state would need to become truly horrific before most folk would notice and act. Today, there is more than ample evidence that we are in free fall.

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