new york times

NYT is all-in for Deborah Ross

Do-nothing Burr's days just might be numbered:

The contrast between the two candidates could not be sharper. Mr. Burr is a quiet party wheel horse whose career in the House and the Senate has been supported by significant campaign donations from the fossil fuel and nuclear energy industries. He was appointed to Donald Trump’s national security advisory panel, but, like many Republican incumbents, he has been hemming and hawing about Mr. Trump’s demoralizing candidacy. “I take him at his word,” the senator said rather meekly after Mr. Trump denied that he had ever committed the sexual assaults on women that he bragged about in the “Access Hollywood” tape. Mr. Burr has been trying to convince voters that Hillary Clinton’s “lack of judgment” is worse than Mr. Trump’s.

I'm tempted to rephrase the above description to a "horse's ass," but Burr really has followed Liddy Dole's footsteps as a fundraising machine for the GOP. He has (at last count) twelve different campaign accounts registered with the FEC, which goes a long way in explaining why so much money comes his way during elections. Not just because he's a reliable "No" vote on so many needed government regulations, but also (maybe more important to them) because he has laid the infrastructure for corporate domination in Washington. He's the money man, and they can't grease the wheels without him. Representing the people? There's no time for that, because the money must flow.

Where's North Carolina?

In the South, or course. While patches of progressives (and progression) dot the landscape though not necessarily in this order; Asheville, Raleigh, Charlotte, Greensboro/Winston Salem, New Bern and possibly Wilmington, large areas of the state are in ….. literally, no man's land. The western part of the state gets a healthy dose of its politics from the pew of an evangelical church. The east, from decades of murmurs regarding both Raleigh and the federal government and their decisions, whether it be lack of funding or intrusion and displacement from once inhabited sections of the Outer Banks. The ties that bind however are having, understanding and an appreciation for education. But its more than just a noun. It's the ability to think things through; sometimes sleep on decisions, understand other people through sociology and amassing some degree of knowledge that presents itself, at a moment's notice, during the course of life.

Wilmington Race Riots in the New York Times

An important event in North Carolina's history was the Wilmington race riots of 1898, which resulted in the only successful overthrow of a local government in the history of the United States. The riot occurred on November 10, 1898, an election day. The City was being run by a Black and Republican government during reconstruction. On the election day, the Republicans were defeated in part by a ballot box stuffing campaign. After the vote, some Whites attempted to gain control of the city immediately. When the sitting government refused, riots ensued.

The first headline in New York regarding the event was entitled "Whites Kill Negroes and Seize City of Wilmington" (photo included below). The newest headline in New York addresses not just the event but also the findings of the Wilmington Race Commission, a commission created by the NC legislature to examine the events. The New York Times posted a story entitled "North Carolina City Confronts Its Past in Report on White Vigilantes" today here.

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