domestic terrorism

Profiles in hatred: Anti-Muslim extremists invade US cities

White supremacy seems to be the common denominator:

Far-right groups converged on the grounds of the State Capitol in Raleigh for an anti-sharia law rally, part of a nationwide string of events hosted by the anti-Muslim organization ACT for America, on Saturday. “There are no KKK here, there are no Nazis here,” said Peter Boykin, president of Gays for Trump and the local coordinator for the Raleigh anti-sharia rally. Despite his disavowal of extremism, Boykin publicly thanked Identity Evropa, a group founded last year that openly espouses white supremacy, after members in matching white dress shirts punctuated speeches with chants of, “Sharia-free USA” and “We will not be silenced.”

If you're wondering (as I frequently do) on what could lead to somebody joining such a fringe group, which often requires traveling great distances just to publicly display your ignorance, the most obvious first choice is deeply-ingrained racism. But it's more than that, and at least some of the responsibility may rest on our shoulders. To go this far, you have to also possess an incredible lack of trust in our system of government, the way our laws are developed and enforced. Many on the Left are guilty of relentlessly attacking that (entire) system, as opposed to being surgical in their criticisms, and this has helped to erode public trust across the board. And in that trust-deficient environment, fear always steps in to fill the void. And so we hear the names of ambiguous and "code-enhanced" groups emerging:

When staff editorials go badly wrong

Trying to be too clever for your target audience:

Our Opinion: The threat among us

The Islamic State is at work in North Carolina. Fortunately, so is the FBI.

The murderous terrorist organization controls a large territory in Iraq and Syria, but it also controls the minds of many young people around the world and in this country.

Headline and intro to an editorial in the Greensboro News & Record, which I believe the intent was to demonstrate that fearing someone based on their name, skin color, societal profile, etc., is a mistake. The idea behind this effort is sound, but the delivery is the problem. Trying to "hook" the target audience (Islamaphobes) with inflammatory language, and then towards the end of the article tell them they'd be better off to fear their next-door-neighbor than refugees escaping violence. I consider myself adept at detecting nuanced messages, and this one was a challenge. For those already steeped in fear of the Muslim hordes and other dark-skinned invaders, this approach will accomplish little more than ratcheting up their fear level.

First in extremism: NC's role in domestic terrorism

It may be a hard pill to swallow, but the truth often is:

Another terrorist attack. Another grim tally of the dead and wounded. Another killer full of hate, from a land that breeds such men. Like millions of migrants before him, the perpetrator crossed the border unchallenged. And like others, he struck our country without warning.

Our politicians say they’ll stop these killers. They talk about building walls and vetting refugees. If we were serious, we would do it. We would seal our borders against North Carolina.

I had a very similar conversation over the weekend, in which I listed a half-dozen or so North Carolina-bred terrorists. And (of course) mental illness was mentioned more than once, which has become our default rationalization. It's not a corollary or cause & effect formula, they both exist independent of each other: We don't dedicate enough resources to treat the mentally ill, *and* we have developed a society that views (Christian) religious extremists as "very faithful" instead of dangerous. And when they cross the line, we don't blame the pastor who pushed them over the line with his teachings, we say he wasn't wired right. Unless he attacks an abortion clinic, which way too many of our citizens view as justifiable:

Mercenaries providing security at Carter-Finley?

Sometimes the cure is worse than the illness:

NC State is ramping up security at Carter Finley Stadium for its final two home games.

School officials say there will be increased security and law enforcement officers inside and outside the stadium, in the parking lots and in areas surrounding the stadium as a precaution.

I hesitated posting this, because a) I could very easily be mistaken, and b) If I'm not mistaken, publicizing Tiger Swan's involvement could (theoretically) cause additional security issues at the events in question. But people deserve to know if private military contractors are operating in their presence.

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