What you need to know about Fracking in 400 words or less...and NCDENR meeting Oct 10

Do you know about hydrofracking, the method of extracting methane gas from the ground by creating micro-earthquakes to fracture rock and release the gas?

Horizontal drilling and fracking are currently illegal in North Carolina but there is political pressure to change laws to allow it.

Monday night, October 10th, the NC Department of Natural Resources is convening a public input meeting on the shale gas study, Oct. 10 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in Sanford at the McSwain Extension Education & Agriculture Center. If the issue of fracking is already on your radar, I encourage you to attend. I will be there and will report on it afterward.

Thanks to the statewide summit on fracking put on last month by Clean Water for North Carolina, I have started to learn a lot about what the impacts of fracking could mean to out state. It's not a pretty picture.

I wrote up my notes from that meeting, and additional research, in two blog posts:

What you need to know about Fracking in 400 words or less (and four photos)

Why you need to know about Fracking — it may be coming to a field or neighborhood near you. This much longer post includes more links to additional reporting.

Details about the October 10th NCDENR meeting (via Clean Water for NC):

DENR Calls for Public Input to Shale Gas Study—Oct 10, Sanford
The agency has announced a meeting to get public input on the shale gas study, Oct. 10 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in Sanford at the McSwain Extension Education & Agriculture Center located at 2420 Tramway Rd. Written comments on the draft plan of study will be accepted through Oct. 18, in addition to any feedback received at the Oct. 10 public meeting. Written comments can be sent to Shale_gas_comments@ncdenr.gov; or through the mail to NCDENR, attn: Trina Ozer, 1601 MSC, Raleigh, NC 27699.

Who should come to the Oct 10 public meeting or submit comments by October 18?
Anyone who is concerned about the study approach, structure or description of the study topics, or who sees any key study areas missing. Also, those who have personal experiences, expertise or resources for the DENR study team can provide valuable input. You do not need to be from one of the potentially impacted shale areas to have useful input to the study. To see some general concerns about the study that we’ve identified to help get you started on preparing comments, click here for talking points from Clean Water for NC.