Topic of the week: What's in a name?

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Given the wide-ranging discussion that's been going on, what should we rename the Vance-Aycock and Jefferson-Jackson dinners? Should we continue to honor dead white racists, or might a little cultural sensitivity be in order?

Treasurer Richard Moore, to his credit, is already on record calling to rename Vance-Aycock.

"When you read Gov. Aycock’s speeches and understand the full, unvarnished history, the only conclusion is that he fought against the principles that the Democratic Party stands for,” said Moore, the state treasurer.

The floor is now open for nominations for new names. Or not.

Comments

I've got it!

We'll name one of the dinners the "Moore Perdue Dinner" and the other can be called the "Perdue Moore Dinner."

Or maybe if we want to make it a really big tent, we can go with Billy Bob McSmith?

Renaming the dinners

Sanford-Hunt doesn't sound too bad. Nor does Jefferson-Roosevelt.

I'm sure that there are at least a couple of folks in North Carolina who think that the Jefferson-Jackson dinner refers to NC A and T's Jesse Jackson.

50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

Should we continue to honor

Should we continue to honor dead white racists, or might a little cultural sensitivity be in order?

A little loaded, isn't it?

The Vance-Aycock celebration is obviously something that needs to be addressed, but I think the decision regarding the JJ dinner ought to be left to the DNC.

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There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

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There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

A little loaded for sure.

Which is why I'm glad more circumspect voices are out there to push back. Thanks!

:)

Considering the priorities of the N.C.

Democratic Party during much of the state's history, finding appropriate heroes/role models that are representative of today's values won't be easy. I mean, even Senator Sam was kind of an as...okay, maybe I better stop while I'm behind. :)

I fear you're right

We may have to go with inanimate objects. Or maybe . . .

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I've been thinking about that too.

Let's pick a date for later this spring . . . before the primary . . . and I'll host a full-fledged BlueNC Barbecue Bash, open to all comers for the low, low price of $9.99, complete with live music, fun and games, and only a few short speeches by somebody (other than me).

We can invite candidates and officials from far and wide, plus the entire NC blogosphere, including of course, friends on the right, left, center and beyond. We should try to get the media moguls to attend too.

Sound good?

James

Shoot A, I'd be willing to pay.....

an even higher fee. Will there be a committee/group of volunteers to help?

No matter that patriotism is too often the refuge of scoundrels. Dissent, rebellion, and all-around hell-raising remain the true duty of patriots.

Progressive Discussions

What about non-party people?

For instance, in doing some research, I found the name Helen Morris Lewis. In addition to being a loud voice in the suffrage movement, she ran for office in Asheville in 1897, a full 20 years before the 19th amendment was ratified.

Now she might not be the best choice, that is the only real information I could find on her. But still. Someone like that might be a good choice. Why does it need to be a senator or governor or president?

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

My first thought

Was someone from the Greensboro 4. But there are 4 of them, and I certainly am unqualified to pick out one of the 4.

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

We should contact some of the people

we've spotlighted here. (The family who lost about everything because of medical bills.) I know there's more that others will remember.

No matter that patriotism is too often the refuge of scoundrels. Dissent, rebellion, and all-around hell-raising remain the true duty of patriots.

Progressive Discussions

Here's a couple of suggestions:

We could trade in the Vance/Aycock title for Clayton/Watt.

And if you want to highlight someone who exhibited an unbelievable amount of courage and dedication during a time of downright nastiness directed at her profession, it doesn't get much better than Charlotte Hawkins Brown.

Vance-Aycock-Lucas

Eddie Davis, who's challenging Atkinson for the State Sup. job in the Dem primary, has suggested adding name of late state Senator Jeanne Lucas (Durham), the first black woman to serve in the Senate.

I'm down.

Sen. Lucas should be recognized.

Is that Eddie Davis from Snow Hill?

Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

No, he's from Durham too...

Hence why he's pushing Sen. Lucas (and why I know about him). He's currently president of the NC Association of Educators. I don't mean any of this as an endorsement -- I know very little about his candidacy, other than that he was a leader in getting a historical marker for one of the earliest sit-ins in the state here in Durham, at the Royal Ice Cream Parlor.

cool thanks.

There is a Mayor Davis from Snow Hill, and I met him a long time ago, and thought, this guy is going somewhere.

Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

Sharp Frye

Bob Orr has decided not to post on blogs himself during the primary, but he did send me an email with this thought:

I’d change one of those dinners to a Sharp/ Frye dinner honoring Susie Sharp and Henry Frye – two good people who broke down barriers for women and African-Americans in NC.

Changing the name...

Sigh...

This part of the reason progressives don't get as much done as we should.

If the name's going to change, let it happen quickly, with a minimum of public debate (no opportunities for pious windbags to grandstand). Let the name change to something generic as hell so as never to offend anyone except the aesthetes among us.

I'll vote for Democratic Party Dinner ____ (insert year).

I understand that some find these names offensive. O.K. Change them then. But for God's sake we've got more important things to do.

Scrutiny Hooligans - http://www.scrutinyhooligans.us

I'm not so sure, Gordon.

This part of the reason progressives don't get as much done as we should.

I think progressives compromise way too much as it is, allowing conservatives and moderates to limit the amount of change that's brought about. We accept progressive-sounding legislation in lieu of substantial progress, hoping real change will follow in its footsteps.

Vance and Aycock were leaders of the Democratic Party during a time when said party used fear, hatred and sometimes violence to keep the races at odds with each other in this state, and to glorify them is to glorify the white supremacist practices they were involved in.

Sometimes real change begins when people are strong enough to smash their old icons and face the future with eyes open.

I understand

I understand that some people see it this way. I don't think much along these lines in the first place, so it feels like a lot of ado about very little. However, if folks want to change 'em, change 'em. I don't have an attachment either way.

We can call them Jesus Christ dinners, Gandhi dinners, or Jim Hunt dinners. It's all the same to me. Just so folks show up and focus on what they're there to do - raise money and help each other.

Scrutiny Hooligans - http://www.scrutinyhooligans.us

On naming things.

I think we should consider who is perfectly, politically correct.

Washington - he tried to slaughter the Indians at Fort Pitt, but got his ass kicked. No Washington on anything in the United States.

Jefferson - a slave owner, who had children by his "property". He's definitely out.

Actually, pretty much any North Carolinian who ever owned or supported slavery, so that brings us up to say the 1890s.

Max Gardner and his machine - 1929 through WWII:

Gardner was a moderate and pragmatic politician. As a mill owner and friend of Piedmont textile, tobacco, and banking interests, Gardner promoted a pro-business agenda and fought unions, child labor legislation, and economic regulations.....Severe cuts in government spending and the implementation of a three-percent sales tax, for property tax relief, preserved a balanced budget--far more important to most politicians in Raleigh than social programs to deal with the Great Depression. Even educational institutions in 1933 faced a forty two-percent cutback.

Okay, they are out.

Post-WWII:
How about Chief Justice Susie Sharp (1907-1996)

Interestingly, Judge Sharp was an old school Southern Democrat. She rejected the “feminist” label and publicly opposed the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) of the early 1970s; she even attempted to persuade legislators to vote in the negative. Some have credited her, along with her friend Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. (1896-1984), for playing a big part in defeating the ERA in North Carolina.

Although she held an enviable judicial position, Sharp no doubt disappointed women’s rights activists. Sharp once said: “The trouble comes when a woman tries to be too many things at one time: a wife, a mother, a career woman, a femme fatale… A woman has to draw up a blueprint. She has got to budget her life.” Judge Sharp never married.

Okay, she's off the list.

I guess we're left with Sanford, Hunt, and Easley.

My point is that I don't agree with some aspects of this discussion. Do I want to attend a dinner named after a supporter of the Klu Klux Klan? No. Do I want to attend a dinner named after someone who wiped out slews of ancient Americans? No.

Do I want to go around making everything incredibly, politically correct? No.

I support Jackson because he was the person who tore the Presidency from the hands of aristocracy. Before him, the "throne" belonged to wealthy landowners who had come from landowners. Jackson was largely his own man, he broke the mold.

How about his protege, James K. Polk.

He was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, in 1795. Studious and industrious, Polk was graduated with honors in 1818 from the University of North Carolina. As a young lawyer he entered politics, served in the Tennessee legislature, and became a friend of Andrew Jackson....Few presidents have been more successful in attaining their goals. In spite of the fact that during his administration the nation was involved in a war with Mexico, a territorial dispute with Great Britain, and the issues of slavery, the bank, and the tariff, Polk has emerged in the light of history as "a sound statesman, an unusually capable executive, and an unwavering patriot." He was conscientious to the extreme, and if his executive ability showed weakness, it was that he regarded it as a duty that he "supervise the whole operations of the Government." His position in American history was long underrated, and unjustly so, but in a poll of fifty-five leading American historians conducted in 1948, Polk was ranked with Theodore Roosevelt, Grover Cleveland, and John Adams as one of the nation's four near-great presidents.

One of the pitfalls of childhood is that one doesn't have to understand something to feel it. - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

Polk was from Mecklenburg

...and everybody knows that folks from Mecklenburg can't win a statewide race. :)



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Vote Democratic! The ass you save may be your own.

I expected better from you

Your leap of logic unfairly paints a moderate position as extreme.

My point is that I don't agree with some aspects of this discussion. Do I want to attend a dinner named after a supporter of the Klu Klux Klan? No. Do I want to attend a dinner named after someone who wiped out slews of ancient Americans? No.

Do I want to go around making everything incredibly, politically correct? No.

You are invoking the "evil" of political correctness to force a comparison that is not valid.

There is quite a difference between being a man of your time like Washington or Jefferson and going out of your way to persecute and murder a peaceful people as Jackson did.

The two are not equal.

Person County Democrats

I actively oppose gerrymandering. Do you?

Don't erase history - acknowledge it

While I'm not thrilled with everything he's done, UNC Chancellor James Moeser has taken a very good stance on this I think. Here's an example:

When I was in the graduate school in the department of Geography, my office was in a building called Saunders, named after a staunch supporter of the University in the late 19th century. He was also a leader in the KKK. The question then becomes, should his name be stripped off the building?

Moeser's answer was, no, but let's not brush that under the rug either. Instead, he commissioned a monument on the north side of campus to the African-Americans, both enslaved and free, who helped to build the University, and issued an official statement condemning the KKK and apologizing for any involvement that officials of the University had in any previous actions.

I like that

Thats a great way to handle it.

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

I was there Saturday too.

And I was disappointed that parliamentary procedure was used to delay action the body was clearly ready to take.

But why do we have to name the dinners after people anyhow? How about some names that reflect our values or our direction?
-NCDP Gathering for America's Future
-NCDP Heroes and History Dinner
-NCDP Dinner for Democracy
-NCDP Annual People's Gathering

There's a good idea....

NCDP Gathering for America's Future

Instead of focusing on the past, let's look to the future. I like that.

One of the pitfalls of childhood is that one doesn't have to understand something to feel it. - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

I really like those, Graig

especially Dinner for Democracy.

Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

I like dinners named after people

Gives the event some depth. Let's just find better people -- as I said in the BBQ topic, how about the "Sanford-Bowles dinner?"

Big Tent Bluegrass and Barbecue

:)

OK...I'm sorry. I'm being silly.

I guess we should avoid naming it after a person in the likely event that there will come a time that we find out that person is/was less than perfect.



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Vote Democratic! The ass you save may be your own.

Big Tent Bluegrass, Blues and Barbeque

or maybe The Big Donkey Do. :)

Actually, some of those names mentioned above (in the more serious comments) sound very interesting.

I choose to be inspired.

"They took all the trees and put them in a tree museum Then they charged the people a dollar 'n a half just to see 'em. Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got till it's gone? They paved paradise and put up a parking lot."

The Big Donkey Do :)

I like alliteration.....

Big Tent Bluegrass, Blues and Barbeque Bash!

Now, that would be one helluva party.



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Vote Democratic! The ass you save may be your own.