Sunni Leprechauns? (political cartoon)

Crossposted from Town Called Dobson & My Left Wing


click to enlarge

Since Pelosi and some of the newly minted Democratic House members seem unable to find the courage to get us out of this God-forsaken war, we need to turn to Leprechauns. Yes, Leprechauns.

We can start confiscating the Leprechaun's pots of gold to help manage the deficit and we need to start recruiting in Ireland. Because if we can't depend on Democratic backbone to get us out of Iraq, we will need all the luck we can get.

Now, if we can just get Ted Kennedy in the race.

Comments

Aww Stormbear

the Republics have already stolen their pots of gold, and when asked about it, their comment is usually, "Look, there's a unicorn!".

No matter that patriotism is too often the refuge of scoundrels. Dissent, rebellion, and all-around hell-raising remain the true duty of patriots.

Progressive Discussions

So they think

we all have ADD?

I guess so, and for four years the majority did

but now there's people paying attention and they don't like what they see. It's kind of upsetting to see the dems not taking a firmer stand and the blue dogs undermining the whole majority thing.

I say thank goodness that gold is not the only thing it takes. Citizen involvement and action can speak much louder than all the corporate money.

No matter that patriotism is too often the refuge of scoundrels. Dissent, rebellion, and all-around hell-raising remain the true duty of patriots.

Progressive Discussions

Irish lessons

Irishman Tom Barry learned a lot about guerilla warfare in Iraq 90 years ago.

In 1915, during World War I, he enlisted in the British Army and fought in Mesopotamia (then part of the Ottoman Empire, present day Iraq)
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On November 28, 1920, Barry's unit ambushed and killed almost a whole platoon of British Auxiliaries at Kilmichael, County Cork. In March 1921 at Crossbarry in the same county, Barry and 104 men, divided into seven sections, broke out of an encirclement of 1,200 strong British force from the Essex Regiment. In total, the British Army stationed over 12,500 troops in County Cork during the conflict, while Barry's men numbered no more than 300. Eventually, Barry's tactics made West Cork ungovernable for the British authorities.
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In 1949, Barry published his memoirs of the Irish War of Independence, "Guerilla Days in Ireland", which became a classic account of the war and an influential guide on guerrilla warfare.

Sound familiar? Perhaps something to be learned.