In The Lancet: North Carolina HB2 is bigotry's counterattack on LGBT rights

Founded in 1823, The Lancet is a well-respected, peer-reviewed British medical journal. Not a hotbed of politically correct ideologues. Though if all you read were the McCrory et al federal court filing in defense of HB2, you might be granted temporary forgiveness for thinking so. When in fact, The Lancet's works stand squarely on the scientific evidence.
Yesterday, in a letter to the Lancet, UNC Medical School professor Joseph D. Tucker, MD, and UNC Professor of Public Health Policy Benjamin M Meier offered North Carolina as a clear example of bigotry's counterattack on LGBTQ rights.
It is, and they get right to the root issue:

HB2 supporters say that it will prevent men from entering women's bathrooms, but this faulty logic relies upon three misunderstandings. First, transgender individuals are far more often the victims of sexual violence,3 not the perpetrators. Second, many transgender individuals have long used bathrooms that match their gender identity without conflict and, in most cases, without notice. Third, sexual violence in public bathrooms is rare and unrelated to antidiscrimination laws, with no detected influence of transgender antidiscrimination laws on sexual assault.4

Although they dealt with the bathroom predator myth, Tucker and Meier did not address the issue of whether transgender individuals actually exist.
It isn't a scientific issue.
Although McCrory et al partnered with members of a hate group, the American College of Pediatricians, in an attempt to make an issue of it. The group's activities are documented by the Southern Poverty Law Center.
Tucker and Meier conclude that "North Carolina's bigotry bill serves as a powerful reminder of the need to ensure the rights that underlie health."
The brief filed Wednesday in "OPPOSITON" (sic) to the federal motion for a preliminary injunction barring enforcement of HB2, illustrates the lengths to which bigotry will go in an attempt to have its way with us all.

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Comments

Definitely not a scientific issue

Same-sex attraction and gender identity are not the results of confusion, they're almost exclusively genetic. Some environmental factors or diseases can screw with hormone levels, but even many of those cases can be tracked back to genetics.

And the most dangerous thing to do is go *against* that hard-wiring. Living a lie or being the subject of shaming and bullying has produced a horrific suicide rate, and that is something we can (and should) change.

Truly: Appropriate treatment is the key

The Lancet reported In a July 23 article, "Transgender people: health at the margins of society:"

Social, hormonal, and surgical transition are associated
with improvements in emotional health and wellbeing,
and are now widely viewed as effective treatments for
gender dysphoria. However, across much of the world,
gender-affirming health care is unavailable, or is difficult
to access or afford. Mental health-care services, which are
scarce in many countries, 64 can be especially hard to
access. Transgender people can remain at increased risk
of death, including death by suicide, even after
transition.