God told me not to vote for Huckabee

With all the hubbub going on around immigration these days, and in light of the swarm of right-wing locusts that have invaded North Carolina, I have spent much of the day praying. Seriously.

And in the midst of all my kneeling and genuflecting, I asked God whether or not I should vote for Mr. Huckabee, the rising Christian superstar who fancies himself to be The Chosen One. I took my cue from this excerpt from Huckabee's speech at Liberty University last week:

Much of the news conference focused on Huckabee’s reference to God as a major driving force behind his increasing popularity. When asked if God was solely responsible for his surge in the polls, Huckabee clarified: “I’m saying that when people pray, things happen. I’m not saying that God wants me to be elected. The last time I checked, he hadn’t registered in any of the states to vote. If he does register, be sure to let me know, because I will ask for his vote.”

After all that praying, I am sorry to report that Mr. Huckabee has apparently been talking to the wrong god. The god I talked to today said he would not vote for Huckabee no matter how many times he asks.

I guess that settles that.


Comments

Thanks to Ed Cone

for hooking me up on this one.

:)

n/t


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

You laugh

I'm serious.

Walter Jones and Mike Huckabee must have a line on the same Big Guy because they both think their public policy positions are divinely inspired.

Maybe they should be running for Pope instead of Congress and the Presidency.

I wasn't laughing.

I was smiling. I am frustrated by the assumed dominance of one form of one religion and its narrow view of deity. I'm even more frustrated by the assumption that morality is governed by belief in said deity.


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

good morning :)


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

Governor Huckabee check your Religious inbox please

Memo From The Great Architect Home Office
To Governor Huckabee

Hi Mike! I am Michael the Arch Angel in charge of security for the Great Architect. He wanted me to pass this on to you about your recent comment that he [ Great Architect] was in your political camp with your massive surge in Iowa.

According to my log, you made this comment to Liberty University home of that recent desease Preacher Jerry Farwell. I am informing you should you make another comment about the Great Architect surging your political ass toward victory in some backwater state, I have full authority to zap your formerly fat ass back to Arkansas like I did to Brother Jerry. Now shape up or I will kick your skinny Wal-mart ass back to Utah with Mitt Romey Golden Plated magic Religious undershorts.

Yours, Mick with a taser lighting bolt you won't believe

What Ed, Huckabee & God won't tell you about the Paul Revolution

What you god fearing redneck Huckabee fans don't know yet? Matt has not miss one yet. Is the Ron Paul revolution really the anti-christ's biggest nightmare to come?

Note* Matt was a close associate of Max during the old days of the Republican revolution

Matt Towery's Inside The Numbers:
Secrets ... And A Shocker For Iowa Primary
By Matthew Towery

(12/6/07) "Listen. Do you want to know a secret? Do you promise not to tell?"

No, it's not the lyrics to the famed Beatles song. This is deep politics and strategy.

What has seemed for so long to be a far-distant Iowa caucus is now about to arrive in less than a month.

First, the secrets. There are plenty of people who've worked in presidential campaigns, or who have deep knowledge of how the system works. For them, this will not come as a great surprise, especially for those who are familiar with the old term "street money."

They'll know that street money was used primarily in Southern or big-city elections in the past. Maybe it won't come as a surprise, either, that there has also been a more quietly kept tradition of "cash for a vote" in past Iowa contests.

Here's how it has worked in some instances: Potential voters were recruited by deep-pocketed campaigns, often from states other than Iowa. They were put on buses to be delivered to the appointed caucus locations.

While Iowa has taken measures to end the "invasion" of out-of-state participants in this year's caucus, it's unlikely that the use of "gratuities" by at least one or two campaigns will come to an end.

Is there proof positive, a smoking gun or a photo of $100 exchanging hands for any voter's participation? Absolutely not. But then again, there has never been that same evidence for the widely accepted fact that payment of voters in the Southern and big-city races has taken place. But it has.

The real problem this go-round is that some of the big-money candidates have squandered their cash. One wonders whether their campaigns, or their friends, have managed to hold on to enough loot to provide the presents and gratuities necessary to pull otherwise uninterested voters out of their homes, to force them to remain locked in some community center, where they must listen to advocates for candidates and remain firmly entrenched in the corner of the facility until their candidates' votes are finally counted.

And, of course, those buses are less likely this time to be carrying any shipment of "Iowans" who just happen to reside outside the state. In other words, it may well be that just as "street money" is a dying tradition in the South, its Midwestern equivalent is dying off as well.

Let me make it clear: This past practice was not limited to one political party. More importantly, those in the know in Iowa plan to be on high alert for indications of gratuity incentives that might be used to increase voter turnout in January.

And that brings me to what I increasingly believe will be the "shocker" in the Iowa caucus. Let me make it clear that my vague description of activities above has nothing to do with the prediction I'm about to make.

As I've written in prior columns, I find it hard to believe that massive numbers of voters returning from their New Year's celebrations -- in a state where it gets dark at 4:30 p.m. and is likely to be very cold -- will be compelled to leave the toasty confines of their homes and abandon watching the Orange Bowl game in order to vote in a caucus.

Under this theory, turnout will be impossible to predict. There are many theories that I've already explored about which candidates, of both major parties, might benefit from this quirky set of circumstances created by the move of the Iowa caucus to Jan. 3. But the one candidate I believe could benefit above all others will be GOP candidate Ron Paul. Iowa political insiders I've talked to agree.

After covering the public appearances of various presidential candidates on the Republican side, and even participating in the seemingly secure atmosphere of a post-debate media "spin room," I have been amazed at the zeal of Ron Paul supporters to appear in huge numbers.

What received little coverage out of last week's CNN-YouTube debate in Florida was that the biggest demonstration outside the hall was a parade of Paul supporters. Inside the spin room, where credentialed journalists and, now, bloggers are allowed to interview candidates and their surrogates, a seemingly unknown but large group of "reporters" surrounded Paul.

At a recent Rudy Giuliani rally, the Paul supporters virtually outnumbered the Giuliani crowd.

All of this tells me that what looks like 6 percent of the vote for Paul in states like Iowa could easily, especially where turnout is low, move toward double digits. From what my friends in Iowa are telling me, Huckabee or some other candidate may emerge the winner, but the big story that night may be that the contrarian Paul could find himself placing ahead of some really big names. Time will tell.
Matt Towery served as the chairman of former Speaker Newt Gingrich's political organization from 1992 until Gingrich left Congress. He is a former Georgia state representative, the author of several books and currently heads the polling and political information firm InsiderAdvantage. To find out more about Matthew Towery and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Obviously

ol' Huck has been praying to the gnostic demiurge rather than the supreme monadic Aion Teleos. Somebody needs to tell him his god is too damn small.

LOL!

Hadn't seen that one before!

But then, you never really know what kind of widget these weenies worship.

Preachers, however not technically, run every Middle East Nation

Preachers also are the primary powerbase in many Pacific Nations where poverty, death and suffering are common place and normal.....

The influence of Preachers have, in a very big way, influenced the massacres which have taken place in Iraq.

A single Preacher completely controls Hezbollah terrorist in Lebanon and the West Bank of Palistine ........

Christian, Muslim, or whatever...every preacher is a human being. Every human being is driven, even if only in a small way, by selfishness, greed and the desire for power. A preacher in a position of "almost" absolute power may not be "exactly" what the American people want at this time in our history....Our future is too important.

"Don't pay any attention to that man behind the curtain" Wizard of Oz

Marshall Adame
2014 U.S. Congress Candidate NC-03

Recent bumper sticker ...

seen at the local UU church: "If you want to live in a nation governed by religion ... move to Iran"

Please give us ...

at least 48 hours notice if you ever decide to run for office and delete this blog. Seriously, the guy said he prayed for wisdom and guidance and gave God the credit for his rise in the poll. He clearly said *God does not want me to be elected* but you claim he said the opposite.

How does that differ from any other person of faith who credits their "god" for their personal success?

You are still doing a great job James.

ps. I am not a Huckabee supporter. Just tired of the extremes of both parties obfuscating public discourse with absurdity.

Hi isykes, I think the real point is made without malice.....

The point James made is very clear to the average guy like me.

Political discourse, in America today, is very much steeped in the absurd.

The absudity of an "omnipotent" God perferring the death of some, in his creation, over others is no barrier to many politicians today.
Politicians who "utilize God" to a political end are pandering to the base instincts of "people of faith", of which I count myself.

I resent that utilization, and I feel every person who respects the notion of God, or believes God is the ominpotent force who created the universe, should, in my view, resent politicing in the "Name Of God". It is dishonest.

Marshall Adame
2014 U.S. Congress Candidate NC-03

I thought long and hard about this post

Some of my flippancy about modern religion is hard to take, I know. But as a person raised as a Christian, Baptized, and rededicated, I feel I have every right to call bullshit on people claiming that God is on their side.

Did I spin what Huckabee said? Yes, I did. And I did it to make a point.

If god gets credit for Huckabee's rise in the polls, does god also get credit for Fred Thompson's decline? And if many people praying is the reason God smiled in Huckabee's direction, does that make god subject to lobbying by special interest groups?

The idea that anyone in office grounds their decisions in having gotten personal guidance from god scares the hell out of me. Because while it's a-okay if the god giving the guidance is one you happen to find benevolent . . . it may not be all so great for all possible gods.

Mitt Romney's god used to be a fan of plural marriage. Might still be for all I know.

Does that mean Mitt only listens to his god some of the time? When it's convenient and easy? Sort of like George Bush?

With all due respect...

...your hyperbole distracts from your point.

Oh, and FYI: The quote attributed to Huckabee in the original post is a quote from a news conference subsequent to a speech and Q&A at Liberty University. Here's the video of the actual exchange, for those who are interested.

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracts. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

See -

For me, the video makes it worse. I don't mind a president who has faith - as I believe Jimmy Carter did - and does. I do mind a president who will make judgments of others based on a narrow interpretation of the guiding book of his religion - as I believe Mike Huckabee does. Sure, he's personable, and Chuck Norris thinks he's great, but he's running too far to the right, and I've read that he's courting the Focus on the Family folks, even though Dobson has said that he's not going to endorse him.

We don't need another 4 years of laws being written, and supreme court justices being selected based upon end-days prophecies. A christian man or woman, sure. Or any faith, for that matter. But one that is able to look all of their constituents in the eye and not once think 'Heretic" or 'evildoer" would be a refreshing change of pace.


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

What hyperbole?

You don't think I've been talking to god? You don't think god's been talking to me? You don't think Huck thinks god has special plans for him? You don't think Huck attributes his run-up to the might hand of the lord?

I see some cynicism in my original post, but hyperbole? Please explain.

To Clarify

You call it spin. I call it hyperbole. As jsykes pointed out:

He clearly said *God does not want me to be elected* but you claim he said the opposite.

I think I'm being generous by calling it hyperbole. The discussion of the role faith should play (or should not play, as the case maybe) in politics is a valid one, but coloring that debate like this...it just diminishes what could be a worthwhile discussion.

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracts. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

Oh come on.

Hyperbole aside, Jsykes asserts that I said something I didn't say. I did not claim that Huckabee said "the opposite." I said . . .

And in the midst of all my kneeling and genuflecting, I asked God whether or not I should vote for Mr. Huckabee, the rising Christian superstar who fancies himself to be The Chosen One. I took my cue from this excerpt from Huckabee's speech at Liberty University last week:

. . . which I followed immediately with Huckabee's exact quote:

I’m not saying that God wants me to be elected. The last time I checked, he hadn’t registered in any of the states to vote. If he does register, be sure to let me know, because I will ask for his vote.”

Like you, I'd rather be focusing on the meat of this issue, which is why I wrote the post in the first place. You and Jsykes have chosen to pick up the gauntlet on style instead of substance.

Why is that? Why are people afraid to challenge the intrusion of religion into politics and public policy?

Well.

So what'd you mean, exactly, when you said "Mr. Huckabee, the rising Christian superstar who fancies himself to be The Chosen One?" And how is that not the opposite of what Mike Huckabee said ("I’m not saying that God wants me to be elected")?

You and Jsykes have chosen to pick up the gauntlet on style instead of substance. Why is that?

Because your chosen style is a distraction...and distractions are...well...distracting.

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracts. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

It's not a distraction to me!

:)

I'm sorry my style got you distracted. I've heard a dozen Huckabee speeches, and someday when I have time, I'll assemble all the quotes that lead me to conclude that he thinks he is The Chosen One. That's not exactly the same as saying "God wants me to be elected" ... but I can see how easily the two can be conflated.

In any case, I really AM sorry this got off on the distraction path. It's a baffling subject to me and I really would like to understand it better. That said, I suspect understanding will be hard to come by since matters of faith are, by definition, not grounded in understanding in any traditional sense.

he very clearly said

That the ONLY reason for his rise in the polls was due to God.

Now we might be talking about different quotes, but surely politicians alway say the same thing....

"Keep the Faith"

"Keep the Faith"

My god just freaked out on me

I asked him the same question. He said, "If you people [which I found offensive]keep asking me about this, I will not hesitate to change my number and quite possibly pursue legal action against you. This is my busy time of year, so please just go shopping and get a life!"

Oh, and he asked me to tell Anglico "Hi."

Heh.

You people.

Very funny, Crowbar.

Armor of God

Onward Christian Soldiers

The warriors of America's armed forces fight in the name of justice and freedom around the world, risking their lives to defend these principles whenever and wherever they come under attack.

These fearless men and women answer duty's call day after day, armed with resolute confidence in their mission and the firm belief that America's cause in the world is right. Wielding the sword of honor and wearing the breastplate of righteousness, America's troops tackle every challenge with steadfast conviction and the desire to achieve absolute victory over tyranny.

Offer not valid for soldiers of Muslim, Jewish or other non-Christian faith

watch and weep

Faith-based bloviating from the rapist/murderer-releasing Baptist minister, former Arkansas governor and GOP presidential hopeful about the Man upstairs bumping up his polls.

--
Pam Spaulding
Durham, NC USA

Pam's House Blend
www.pamshouseblend.com

--
Pam Spaulding
Durham, NC USA

Pam's House Blend
www.pamshouseblend.com

Oh, man, he is courting the religious right.

I recently heard Chris Matthews (or someone) say that he was desperate for their help because even though he is polling well, he has no ground game in Iowa or NH.

One of the pitfalls of childhood is that one doesn't have to understand something to feel it. - Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Jesus Swept ticked me off. Too short. I loved the characters and then POOF it was over.
-me

As a person

of faith (an existential-buddhist-christian-agnostic and former pastor), this scares the hell out of me.

Curious, isn't it, that we tend to credit God with all the perceived positives in life and yet don't seem to recognize that those "positives" often imply a negative for someone else. His "surging" means someone else fades away; is God responsible for that too? My bounty all too often means someone else's lack; do I thank God for my bounty AND for their lack? Huck needs to go back and read Mark Twain's Letters from the Earth.

To Answer Your Questions

You asked:

His "surging" means someone else fades away; is God responsible for that too?

Yes.

My bounty all too often means someone else's lack; do I thank God for my bounty AND for their lack?

As a person of faith, I'd have to reject the premise of this question. There are situations which beget a discussion of bounty vs. lack, but they tend to be more tangible (i.e., food, wealth). That's not applicable here.

If I interview for a job and don't get it, my response is not that this person is more favored by God than me or that I've somehow lost favor in His sight; instead, my view--and I think the view of anyone of genuine faith--is that God has another plan. While, admittedly, there's a great deal of frustration that comes with biding your time to see exactly what God's plan for you is, I don't think believers would ever classify it as lack.

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracts. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

God's plan

You're arguing that everything that happens is god's plan. Got it.

Now help me understand this:

When asked if God was solely responsible for his surge in the polls, Huckabee clarified: “I’m saying that when people pray, things happen.

Why do things happen when people pray? I'm not engaging in hyperbole here at all, I'm asking an honest question. I totally do not understand Huckabee's clarification. People prayed for rain in Atlanta last month, but the rain didn't come. Is that part of god's plan? If the rain had come, would that have been part of god's plan, too? And please don't tell me that we can't know the mind of god, because if that's true, nobody has any business whatsoever claiming to know what god wants about anything.

Clearing Up

To be clear, I didn't say that everything that happens is God's plan. I answered a specific question to which I think God's plan, or fate if you prefer the more secular version, is relevant; I never said that I think God's plan extends to all things.

Why do things happen when people pray? The truth is, I can't answer that question fully. Not here, not to a level that would satisfy you, any reader or even myself. I think, though, the better question is: what are these people praying for? I spent time with Sen. Edwards in South Carolina in 2004 and along the rope line after every event, there'd be dozens of people who told the Senator they were praying for him. And while Edwards did go on to win that primary, I don't think people were praying for him to win...I think they were praying for his enduring wisdom and that he'd have the strength to persevere through a rigorous campaign. The more important question has to be: What are people praying for?

But what it really amounts to is this: I'm not a fan of the religious rhetoric that peppers our political debates. I hope for the day where the political lexicon will be defined by a broader, more inclusive language and tone, but until that day comes, I want Democrats to stand up and proclaim the way our faith informs our Party's values. If it sounds like I'm giving Huckabee a break, it's probably because I am.

Part of my beef with Republicans and the religious rhetoric they spew isn't just that they use it, it's that they're hypocritical about it. Listening to most Republicans, you'd think all the Bible talked about for 66 books is homosexuality and abortion. Huckabee's the rare religious conservative willing to step out and say that the Bible is about more than that.

We've been talking for most of the last week about access to post-secondary education for the children of illegal immigrants and while our Democratic gubernatorial candidates flounder, Huckabee's saying, "I don't believe you punish the children for the crime and sins of the parents." He's against all torture, including waterboarding, and for closing Guantanamo. As governor, he showed a willingness to raise taxes to build roads and to fix a broken educational system funding structure (something, by the way that's alluded NC's public servants). He's promoting energy independence...all these things predicated on a deep and abiding faith.

In my view, Huckabee's wrong on a lot of issues (the Fair Tax, most notably), but he's not hypocritical about religion, which in this era of politics when so many people (Democrats and Republicans) are...well, it's enough to shrug away some of my cynicism.

Do I think he might have been better served by just explaining his jump in the polls simply as a miracle, as opposed to using the biblical reference? Yes. Should he just have said, I'm getting outspent 23:1 in Iowa. The fact that I'm still in the race is astounding, the fact that I'm leading is a miracle (which is what he meant)? Yes. But, am I surprised that a Southern Baptist preacher, turned governor, turned presidential candidate went to the house that Jerry Falwell built and make a biblical reference? No, in fact, I wholly expect it. But I've got respect for Huckabee anyway, because he understands that, as President, he's got a moral obligation to extend those two fish and five loaves to all people.

People prayed for rain in Atlanta last month, but the rain didn't come.

Actually, it did

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracts. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

----
There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present, and invoke the security of the comfortable past which, in fact, never existed. - Robert F. Kennedy

fair points, all.

You write very well, and have explained yourself more clearly - I understand more how you think about this issue. I don't necessarily agree with you on the religious stuff, but that's okay. :) I really respect the way you've laid it out here.

We've been talking for most of the last week about access to post-secondary education for the children of illegal immigrants and while our Democratic gubernatorial candidates flounder, Huckabee's saying, "I don't believe you punish the children for the crime and sins of the parents." He's against all torture, including waterboarding, and for closing Guantanamo. As governor, he showed a willingness to raise taxes to build roads and to fix a broken educational system funding structure (something, by the way that's alluded NC's public servants). He's promoting energy independence...all these things predicated on a deep and abiding faith.

These are things that Democrats should pay attention to, and listen to. These are the correct (in my opinion, of course) positions to have - for any person, with or without a religion.


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

Rain

What a tease that god is!

So

George Bush won because it was part of "God's plan"? Unlike you, I'm no predestinarian (either single or double barrel), nor do I buy the notion that "anyone of genuine faith" has to subscribe to the "God's plan" rationale. It becomes all too easy to blame/credit/explain/justify whatever happens by attributing it to God's plan. Sorry, but I don't buy it. Guess I'm not a person of "genuine faith," huh.

GOD told me to vote for a Democrat

I believe the reasoning went something like this:

"I hate those two faced, greedy, money changer Republicans!!"

That was good enough for me.

North Carolina. Turning the South Blue!

North Carolina. Turning the South Blue!

My bumper sticker

from Sojourners:

God is not a Republican
... or a Democrat.

Although ... now that I think about it ... isn't there's some stuff in the bible somewhere about "turn the other cheek" and mercy and love and charity and "love your enemies" and "Thou shalt not lie" and such? That pretty much tells me where W and Cheney and a lot of NC Republicans who claim Christian creds do NOT get their marching orders, if you know what I mean. I really don't know much about Mr. Huckabee. And, seeing as how I wouldn't vote for the man even if I did hear a booming voice from the clouds tell me to because of a few things he claims to believe ... I shouldn't comment on him directly.

"They took all the trees and put them in a tree museum Then they charged the people a dollar 'n a half just to see 'em. Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got till it's gone? They paved paradise and put up a parking lot."

Well, maybe you shouldn't, or won't, but I will.

I'm pretty sure that there will be no booming voice coming out of the clouds, or the earth, to tell you for whom to vote. :)

I'm also pretty sure that what got Huckabee's surge in place has very little to do with anyone's religious activity, and very much to do with political strategy. He is taking the Christian Right's obsession with those who worship differently (Romney) and those who have a different lifestyle (Guiliani), and he's used them (subconsciously, perhaps) to make people afraid. That's got nothing to do with praying, it's preying.

It's disingenuous of him to say that it's because people are praying; prayer isn't what put Chuck Norris on Youtube. He's uninformed about foreign affairs (I know more about the NIE than he does.), as evidenced in your link above, he is willing to consign at least 10% of the American population to second-class citizen status - because it's "moral" - to him. And he says it all with a sweet smile and a well-modulated voice, so people who don't look deeper think he's not too bad and maybe even kinda cool because, you know - Chuck Norris, and all. But I'm not willing to submit to that kind of narrow morality or leadership for another 4 or 8 years. I'm certainly not willing to see what happens to the Supreme Court with a Huckabee administration.

Am I holding his faith against him? No. I am perfectly willing to see him practice his faith whenever he wants to as long as it doesn't influence what happens at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, because his faith should not have anything to do with my government. I believe, based on Huckabee's own statements, that he could not keep his religion from unduly influencing his administration. Even if he weren't a right wing Republican, I would not be able to support him.


Be the change you wish to see in the world. --Gandhi

Oh!! preying!

Ok. Well ... at least he wasn't lying. I just misunderstood. My bad!

Good one, L. ;)

"They took all the trees and put them in a tree museum Then they charged the people a dollar 'n a half just to see 'em. Don't it always seem to go that you don't know what you've got till it's gone? They paved paradise and put up a parking lot."

Vote for Mike Hucksterbee?

If he has to resort to the G*d card to gain in the polls, he's just a repackaged George Bush. I swear I saw this on TV, a smiling George and Laura Bush coming out of their polling place on Election Day 2004, a subliminal symbol on a door behind them in the camera shot. A cross in perfect proportions of a crucifix. Accident...I don't think so. Bush wears religion like a smarmy clown suit.

small>Have you called to support H. Res 333 Impeach Cheney Today? call 202-224-3121 & ask for your Congress member by name