State parks

Some West Virginia state parks and other sights of interest

Jane and I just got back from a two-week camper van trip to West Virginia, where there are many good state parks, state forests and national parks. They're concentrated around the New River Gorge and the Allegheny mountains. For us, a "good" park means several hiking trails (preferably loops of three miles or less), campground toilets, reasonably flat campsites, and smallish. Extra credit for quiet and dark at night.

Camping with Pop

Pop used to take us camping. It was the late 1950s. All those middle class families were in love with their cars and the newly improved highways. People went on Sunday drives with picnics and to their state parks that the Civilian Conservation Corps had developed a decade earlier.

State perks

To describe the NC GOP as “conservative” is to distort the word into oblivion, especially in the area of the environment. Nowhere is this more evident than in their rapacious stewardship of our state parks.

I am writing this post on a rainy day at the David Crockett State Park in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, one of nearly 59 magnificent state parks in Tennessee. Two days ago, we were in Fort Mountain State Park in Georgia, one of 65 in that state. The day before that, we were at Table Rock State Park in South Carolina, one of 47 state parks in that tiny state.

We had hoped to stay in North Carolina on our trip from Chapel Hill, but the pickings were very slim. Remarkably, our beautiful state has only 40 state parks, and once you get west of Asheville, there are none available for camping. This is a problem that’s going to get worse before it gets better.

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