Republican bigots

Confederate monument watch: Guard posted in Alamance

It would be nice if they protected African-American citizens with such dedication:

The monument has been a hot spot several times in the past few years between those calling for the removal of Confederate monuments and statues of Confederate leaders from public property — especially after the 2015 mass murder of nine people at a church in Charleston, S.C. — and those rallying around what they call Southern heritage who want to preserve those statues and display the Confederate battle flag.

The Sheriff’s Office is working with Graham police to “provide manpower,” according to Sheriff’s Office spokesman Kirk Puckett. While he won’t give specifics, Puckett said someone will be there 24 hours a day “until further notice.” There have been no direct threats against the monument or the courthouse, according to Puckett.

While this Graham statue hasn't garnered nearly as much attention as Silent Sam, we've had a few clashes over it. We're also working to get some sort of monument erected in a corner of the square (not pictured) to a former slave who became a magistrate after the war, only to be lynched by the local version of the Klan. That project began shortly after I wrote this Op-Ed a year ago. Read it when you get a chance, it's a fascinating (and horrifying) story. But this current police presence is likely more about preventing pro-Confederate vigilantes from gathering than actually protecting the monument itself:

Kneeling band members reveal bigotry and hatred at ECU

More than enough shame to go around:

After a public records request, the News & Observer reviewed more than 450 pages of emails to and from Staton following the Oct. 1 game in Greenville. More than a dozen band members knelt during the playing of the national anthem, joining in a national wave of protests against police shootings of African-Americans. The ECU protest elicited a chorus of boos from fans in the stadium, and the band had to have a police escort from the game after members were spat on and pelted with trash.

Who would do that? Seriously, who would spit on somebody else at a public event? Who would consider that a proper way to show your disagreement with somebody else's behavior? I tell you who would do that, the same people who would label another as a "thug" simply based on the color of that person's skin. This sounds like something that would have happened during the 50's and 60's desegregation era, not fifty years later. And leave it to the biggest bigots of all to use their family money to pressure the University:

"Celebrity" supporters of bigotry headline rally

A convention of Christian scam artists:

Monday's rally by the "Keep NC Safe" Coalition on the old Capitol grounds in Raleigh comes while vocal national opposition to the law continues. Business executives are urging Gov. Pat McCrory and legislators to repeal the law, Bruce Springsteen canceled his Greensboro concert Sunday because of the law.

Scheduled speakers include the Benham Brothers, Christian author Frank Turek, and Pentecostal minister Bishop Harry Jackson.

Ehh. It reminds me of that time I was visiting rural relatives, and when Saturday rolled around and we hopped in the truck to go see a much-touted "music concert," it turned out to be a gospel trio whose combined ages had to approach the 200 mark. I ended up behind the stage to escape the PA system decibels. Here's a little background on the Bishop referenced above:

Bigotry in Char-O's op-ed pages

Stirring the prejudicial pot:

Argument four is the most troubling. Our society is increasingly moving from common sense accommodation of differences to a push for radical acceptance and approval of lifestyles that the vast majority of people do not condone.

It is not hateful to say a male should use a designated male bathroom because he is male, any more than it is hateful to say a horse is a horse. This is science. It is fact.

Often when linking to an article we encourage readers to click through and read the whole thing. In this case, I recommend you don't. If the Charlotte Observer ranks their content on how many "hits" they draw in, it could encourage more of this offensive and small-minded tripe. I don't give a shit if she (or anybody else) "condones" the lifestyle of other citizens, and I don't care if the pain and distress of discrimination only touches a small percentage of the overall population. Arguments like those are resulting in the slaughter of innocents in other countries, and have no place in our society.

Racist propaganda prompted McCrory's Syrian refugee stance

Drinking deeply from a poisoned well of information:

In interviews, McCrory administration officials say there were ongoing discussions that weekend about a potential response. But when Steen dashed off a message to McCrory's personal email account, it was the first written note by one of his senior advisers urging the governor to consider action, according emails provided in response to a public records request.

"I think you should consider coming out in opposition to any more Syrian refugees coming here to the US or N. Carolina because the FBI says they cannot vet the Syrian refugees," Steen wrote, linking to a story in World Net Daily critical of U.S. refugee policy. Early the next morning, McCrory forwarded that email – adding only "FYI" – from his iPhone to his chief of staff, Thomas Stith.

And it doesn't appear that any of these "leaders" questioned the value of relying on a World Net Daily article to guide their policy decisions, a source that is easily in the top five least reliable outlets for credible information. The article itself is mostly a hit-piece against Lindsay Graham, and the author relies heavily on drivel provided by an extremely questionable "professor" using a borderline fraudulent resume:

Taxpayer-funded discrimination against LGBTQ students

We reserve the right to be bigoted and exclusionary:

“Sexual relationships outside of marriage and sexual relationships between persons of the same sex are immoral and sinful. The depth of the sinfulness of homosexual practice is recognized, and yet we believe the grace of God sufficient to overcome both the practice of such activity and the perversion leading to its practice.”

Lee Christian, the document states, reserves the right to deny admission or expel a student should the “atmosphere or conduct within” the home on these issues run contrary to the private school’s beliefs.

So it's not only LGBT students who are discriminated against; if a straight child's parents are in a same sex relationship, or the single parent of the child engages in such a relationship, however short-term it may be, the student can get the boot. One might be tempted to declare, "Who would want to send their child into such a cultish educational environment?" But that's not the point. The point is, the school should *not* be eligible for taxpayer dollars, regardless of the route that money takes to get there. Parents given vouchers should not be able to "choose" a school that discriminates in such a fashion. That money has to come with some caveats, and this should be at the top of the list.

To BergerMoore, determining the rights of individuals is a game to play

Duck, duck, goose:

The House met five times with an override on the calendar – but did not take it up. On June 4, five lawmakers were absent, but Moore didn’t call for a vote. On June 9, a different five were away. Again, no vote. And so on. On Thursday, in a span of less than 10 minutes, Moore brought up the override; watched as Republicans cut off debate with a procedural move; and then locked the vote in.

Moore said the override “reaffirms the support ... to protect the conscience of magistrates in performing these duties while at the same time ensuring that marriage services are available.”

The only thing it "reaffirms" is the growing hesitation and doubt lawmakers have over the morality of allowing government officials to pick and choose which citizens to help based on religion. It also "reaffirms" the GOP needs to be watched like a hawk to keep them from relegating other citizens to "second class" status.

Religious discrimination bill stalls in NC House

Unfortunately, it's all about the Benjamins:

“For this session, the bill is not going to move,” Moore said during a hastily called news conference. “This bill in its current format, at the current time, is not the proper path to go.”

It came a day after the bill apparently divided House Republicans, who discussed it in a private caucus meeting. The measure had drawn opposition from businesses, including IBM and American Airlines. Republican Gov. Pat McCrory had also expressed reservations.

Don't get me wrong, I'm encouraged by the fact that powerful corporate entities opposed this measure. But what if they hadn't? When your elected officials gauge the propriety of a piece of legislation almost exclusively by whether or not it will hurt them come fundraising time, it simply proves their moral compass is spinning madly. That's no way to run a sausage factory.

State of hate address

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