NCPOL

Research the research

Rep Jay Adams R of Catawba, warmly quoted a friend of his during yesterday's House Finance Committee meeting. The discussion at the time was on an amendment setting parameters for corporate tax relief for research efforts, and it appeared that Adams was in agreement when this friend said to him,

"..research is what you do when you don't have anything else to do…."

Why North Carolina Needs Syringe Decriminalization

What a used syringe looks like

Why North Carolina Needs Syringe Decriminalization

It’s time for North Carolina to do something about its heroin problem. Over the past 6 years, state heroin use rates have more than tripled. More heroin means more injection drug use. More injection drug use means more syringes that could harm children, police officers and the community by transmitting viruses such as HIV and hepatitis B and C. Regardless of whether you choose to use drugs, what happens to those syringes affects all of us. To protect the health and safety of North Carolinians, the state needs to decriminalize syringes. Syringe decriminalization, or removing syringes from the list of items considered drug paraphernalia, lowers the incidence of accidental needle-stick injury to law enforcement and the public, decreases the transmission of blood borne viruses, and allows for safe disposal of used syringes.

New report highlights progress for NC river, calls for more success stories

New report highlights progress for North Fork First Broad River, calls for more success stories

Raleigh, NC.-On the eve of the close of the public comment period for the new Clean Water Rule, a new report tells the story of how the bedrock environmental law has helped to restore and protect the North Fork First Broad River from development and pollution.

Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center, along with small businesses, released Waterways Restored, a series of case studies highlighting the success of the Clean Water Act in protecting places like the North Fork First Broad River, and calling for a new rule to restore protections for more than 135,000 miles of the state’s rivers and streams.

Two-thirds of the General Assembly earn a failing grade on the environment

Two-thirds of the General Assembly Earn a Failing Grade on the Environment
Legislators take the state backwards on environmental initiatives

Raleigh, NC- Today, Environment North Carolina released its 2014 legislative scorecard, and the results don’t bode well for our state’s environment.

“From fast-tracking fracking to failed action on coal ash, legislators showed their true colors this session, and it’s clear that their priority is not protecting North Carolina’s air, water or open spaces,” said Dave Rogers, Field Director with Environment North Carolina.

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