Internet access

The Internet is struggling under COVID 19 traffic

That band is not quite as broad as we thought:

In late January, as China locked down some provinces to contain the spread of the coronavirus, average internet speeds in the country slowed as people who were stuck inside went online more and clogged the networks. In Hubei Province, the epicenter of infections, mobile broadband speeds fell by more than half. In mid-February, when the virus hit Italy, Germany and Spain, internet speeds in those countries also began to deteriorate.

And last week, as a wave of stay-at-home orders rolled out across the United States, the average time it took to download videos, emails and documents increased as broadband speeds declined 4.9 percent from the previous week, according to Ookla, a broadband speed testing service. Median download speeds dropped 38 percent in San Jose, Calif., and 24 percent in New York, according to Broadband Now, a consumer broadband research site.

I am not a tech person (by any stretch of the imagination), so I won't preach too much about the types of activities that may be clogging the system. But I do know this: The gaming industry plays a pretty big role here. My son recently bought a used video game (physical disc), but before he could play it on his platform (physical console), he had to download some massive updates. We started it, went to dinner in a restaurant that was busy, and when we got home it was just finishing the downloads. Hello, 1992. Anyway, don't be surprised if the quality of videos on Netflix and Youtube seems to deteriorate:

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