freedom from religion

Science vs. Fiction: New social studies curriculum erases cave men

Darwin would not be pleased by this development:

Human evolution and prehistoric times would vanish from North Carolina’s social studies curriculum under new proposed standards. But some teachers are fighting to keep the Paleolithic Era alive in classrooms.

Kenneth Dailey teaches sixth-grade social studies at Quail Hollow Middle School in south Charlotte. That means he’s responsible for introducing students to a time more than 10,000 years ago, when Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens shared the planet. "The Paleolithic Era would be where people were more tribal," Dailey said. "They’re hunting and gathering, they’re nomadic, they’re moving around; you know, looking for food, looking for game."

If anything, the schools need to spend more time studying this era. The migration of humanity alone, most notably the early Americans crossing from Asia into the Northwest, is critical in understanding the later culture clash (which we are still dealing with, by the way) of Europeans crossing the Atlantic in the latter 15th Century. But that doesn't fit with the narrow biblical narrative of a young Earth:

Raleigh says "no" to anti-abortion rezoning request

Cue a special session of the NCGA to rewrite municipal zoning laws in in 3...2...:

A Hand of Hope ministry, which operates the Your Choice Pregnancy Clinic and provides free pregnancy services purchased land, which needed to be rezoned to allow for office space, next to A Preferred Women's Health Center at 1604 Jones Franklin Road in January. Hand of Hope had previously leased office space about a quarter-mile away.

City leaders said Tuesday night that the rezoning request is inconsistent with the city’s comprehensive plan, which has a vision that extends to the year 2030. They said rezoning for the anti-abortion group is simply not in tandem with the plan’s policy.

And just what is that Hand of Hope holding out to young potential mothers? Help paying for prenatal care and delivery? No. An Ob/Gyn MD to monitor you and be on-call for the birthing? No. How about help actually finding trustworthy adoptive parents? No, but they'll tell you what a great option it is, and how lonely those poor people are who can't have a baby. Here is the sum total of their services:

First in extremism: NC's role in domestic terrorism

It may be a hard pill to swallow, but the truth often is:

Another terrorist attack. Another grim tally of the dead and wounded. Another killer full of hate, from a land that breeds such men. Like millions of migrants before him, the perpetrator crossed the border unchallenged. And like others, he struck our country without warning.

Our politicians say they’ll stop these killers. They talk about building walls and vetting refugees. If we were serious, we would do it. We would seal our borders against North Carolina.

I had a very similar conversation over the weekend, in which I listed a half-dozen or so North Carolina-bred terrorists. And (of course) mental illness was mentioned more than once, which has become our default rationalization. It's not a corollary or cause & effect formula, they both exist independent of each other: We don't dedicate enough resources to treat the mentally ill, *and* we have developed a society that views (Christian) religious extremists as "very faithful" instead of dangerous. And when they cross the line, we don't blame the pastor who pushed them over the line with his teachings, we say he wasn't wired right. Unless he attacks an abortion clinic, which way too many of our citizens view as justifiable:

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