Tuesday Twitter roundup

Unfortunately, this is now a Top Story:

In the spirit of slowing down on the highway to see if somebody is still pinned in the smashed-up car:

Voller, who said he doesn’t know what the monthly budget is, blamed others. He told Colin Campbell of the N&O: “It’s difficult to get some of the larger counties to want to pay their money to the sustaining fund.”

That’s because they don’t have any confidence in Voller. That’s why Kay Hagan’s campaign worked through the Wake County Democratic Party. That’s why the caucuses put their accounts off limits.

Now that Voller has scheduled the election of the next chair in his hometown of Pittsboro, there’s a suspicion he wants to engineer his own reelection.

Okay, what the hell difference does it make where the SEC meeting is held? There's a finite number of qualified voters, and those are already determined. "Home court advantage" means nothing, even if Voller were contemplating such an ill-advised move. And while Pittsboro may not be along the I-85./40 Corridor(s), there are several state highways leading to it, and it's located (nominally) in the center of the state. The most likely explanation is due to finances; Voller can't afford a ritzy hotel convention center, so he calls in some favors from back home. Some may find it ironic for me to say it, but let's not be so eager to jump on the conspiracy theory bandwagon. Like this idiot:

This is George Holding's only Tweet since the election, a meme which rests upon the idea that your absence from some event equates to your disagreeing with said event. If Obama had attended, the meme would be, "Here's Obama joining hands with a tyrant who wants to bring back the glory of Communist control over Eastern Europe!" Idiot.

That's quite possibly the stupidest thing I've ever read. It's about equal representation of the population, not being afraid of whites. A handful of women and no African-Americans is not a representative body, it's a club. And a club should not be directing public policy for the entire state's population.

This is not to disparage Tom Ross in any way, but: Are we really going to do this for the next year? When some prominent Democrat shows up in the news, whether from being unfairly fired or from waking up from a long-term coma, are we going to immediately speculate on a US Senate run? Why don't we just flip open the phone book to some random page, and then say, "Gustafson. That sounds like a winner, do we know any Gustafsons in the Party?"

You're damn right, because Gustafson rules!

That's gotta be a little disconcerting for Elliot...

Apparently the Peck has yet to realize Charlie Hebdo is actually a Liberal magazine, whose message is (while sometimes easily misconstrued) usually making fun of right-wing nut-jobs. Also:

WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina encourages citizens to participate in events across North Carolina during the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service on January 19, 2015, as well as to create and implement community service projects where need is identified;

NOW, THEREFORE, I, PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim January 19, 2015, as “DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY” in North Carolina, and commend its observance to all citizens.

And I, Steve Harrison, proclaim that oxygen is critical to the healthy functioning of the human body, and commend to all citizens the need to continue breathing.

Noteworthy:

But the court's task is complicated by a paradox. Men and women who seek election to political office — executive or legislative — are expected to make promises to their supporters. That's the essence of democracy. But the only promise a judge should make is to interpret the law to the best of his or her ability without fear or favor.

The Constitution recognizes the latter reality by having the president appoint federal judges, subject to Senate confirmation. Nobody would suggest that their selection is totally free of politics, but potential federal judges are spared from addressing campaign rallies, forming political alliances, raising funds and kissing babies.

Appointment of state judges was also the rule in the earliest years of this country, but in the 19th century some states moved to making the position elective. Today, 39 states choose some or all of their judges in elections.

It's a complicated issue, and not one for which broad statements will fit. Local judges should be elected, to keep them from exerting influence over a small sub-set of politicians while terrorizing the citizenry. District and regional judges should be appointed, because voters wouldn't have a clue how to gauge their effectiveness. But when you're up in the appellate range, including (state) supreme courts, those justices should be elected. Why? Because those seats represent part of the balance of power between branches of government. And yes, by my logic the US Supreme Court should be elected as well, and they should have term limits. Chew on that, why don't you. :)

Two brothers competing for the Darwin Award:

Phil writes that he and Pat have been working together so long that he just considers him a partner in all of their ventures. He was just helping his brother out in 2009 after Pat gave up his livelihood for the noble pursuit higher office.

“So in 2008, in the aftermath of the lost election (that my brother gave up his job and security to pursue), I invited my brother to be my partner again because of his extensive business skills and because of the trust that I have in him,” Phil wrote. “And since he’s become governor of this state we love, I’ve partnered with him any way I can, often just by listening. All of this is what brothers do.”

Let me translate that. “After Pat lost, I brought him on board so we could exploit his political connections to make the big bucks. And now that he’s governor, I know he’ll tell me what I need to know and I don’t have to say a thing. In return, I’ll do whatever I can to keep him in office. That’s why I’m writing this letter.”

On that incomprehensibly spurious note, a bite of the Onion is in order:

Shit, I just spit coffee on my shiny new laptop...

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Comments

Friggin' hilarious!

All of them. But especially this one……

"This is not to disparage Tom Ross in any way, but: Are we really going to do this for the next year? When some prominent Democrat shows up in the news, whether from being unfairly fired or from waking up from a long-term coma, are we going to immediately speculate on a US Senate run? Why don't we just flip open the phone book to some random page, and then say, "Gustafson. That sounds like a winner, do we know any Gustafsons in the Party?"

Steve, you have outdone yourself.

I think I was subconsciously

channeling Nick Galifianakis when I came up with that name. But however it happened, Gustafson is the hot ticket. ;)