Tipping the scales: NC's Judiciary shaped by out-of-state money

The final frontier of unchecked power:

But the mandatory retirement of Sarah Parker, the chief justice from 2006 until the end of August, opened up a spot on the bench. Gov. Pat McCrory appointed Associate Justice Mark Martin, a Republican, to fill the vacancy until the Nov. 4 elections. Robert N. Hunter Jr., a Republican who was on the N.C. Court of Appeals, was then named to serve in Martin’s seat until the election.

That shifted the balance in September to five Republicans and two Democrats. There have been few cases decided since then that reflect what that shift might mean for politically charged lawsuits.

There may have been only time for a "few" cases, but they've been instructive enough. The Supreme Court is gearing up to become much more involved in cases with a partisan nature, pre-empting the lower Court of Appeals when it will be advantageous to do so. That "pro-active" approach to the law does not bode well for those seeking Constitutional clarification or redress, nor does having justices owe allegiance to DC political heavyweights:

In the spring, The Washington Post quoted Matt Walter, president of the Republican State Leadership Committee, as saying: “Republicans have had a significant amount of success at the state level, not only being elected to offices but implementing bold conservative solutions. Unfortunately, that’s running into a hard stop with judges who aren’t in touch with the public.”

Walter announced the creation of the Judicial Fairness Initiative, a project aimed at backing judge candidates with conservative ideologies. He said North Carolina was a state on the target list.

And yes, you can safely equate "bold conservative solutions" with "Unconstitutional attacks on the citizenry" until the cows come home, and not be stretching the truth even a small amount.

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Average Republicans

Average people in the Republican party have no idea of the long-term damage they've caused by their recent temper tantrums. North Carolina has faced many forks in the road recently, and taken the wrong turn again and again. We will be years digging out of the holes they've dug. Generations.