Richard Burr warned Trump lawyer about Mueller targets

CMPD's "De-escalation" training criticized in public meeting

Officer who killed Danquirs Franklin had not received that training yet:

Some who spoke at the church, about a mile from the Burger King where Franklin was shot, said that compliance with police officers is the foremost way to avoid situations like his death. But Sevone Rhynes told Putney that there was no room for Franklin to do so.

“We do not get the opportunity to comply,” he said. “When black people in this country have our humanity recognized, acknowledged and respected, it is only then that de-escalation is going to work.” Deirdre Moss, meanwhile, said there would have been no way for Franklin to have complied without causing Kerl to shoot him. “When can a person in that situation make the right movement that won’t get them killed?” she said.

And again we are faced with a situation that would have been vastly different had this man been white. Police would have talked to him for hours if necessary to avoid taking that shot, even if said white man actually pointed a gun at them. But for a black man, even the possibility he has a gun is a death sentence. I've watched the video several times, and I don't believe he was about to shoot anybody. I will post it below the fold so you can make your own decision. But as I mentioned above, picture a white man doing this and ask yourself what would have happened:

Thursday News: Just don't do it

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BUSINESS LEADERS AND WATCHDOGS OPPOSE DUKE ENERGY'S 5 YEAR RATE PLANS: Lobbyists for large manufacturers, industrial customers and Google spoke against a key section of Senate Bill 559 in committee Wednesday. Walmart, the state's largest private employer and one of its bigger electricity users, issued a statement saying the bill "could lead to unchecked electricity rate increases." "There are better options here," Howard told legislators. "We ask that you slow down." The state's Department of Environmental Quality recently said Duke would have to excavate more coal ash ponds around the state, boosting what would have been a roughly $5.6 billion cleanup plan closer to $10 billion. With those costs and others coming down the pike, "now is not the time to loosen the regulator reins," said Sharon Miller, another lobbyist for large manufacturers.
https://www.wral.com/big-employers-push-back-on-duke-energy-rate-bill/18331861/

Two bills dealing with Rape are no-brainers

And if they are buried in committee we won't just acquiesce:

North Carolina is the only state in the country where continuing a sex act after being told to stop is not a crime due to a decades-old legal precedent. And while the law says sex with an incapacitated person is rape, a court precedent more than a decade old says the law doesn’t apply if the victim caused his or her own incapacitation through drinking or drug use.

The two bills that would change the pair of legal precedents have so far not had a formal committee hearing, but that could change after the legislature’s spring break.

Probably not the time or place to have this particular discussion, but we're going to have it anyway: Sexual intercourse is (of course) the most intimate stage of a relationship, but it's also extremely hormonal in nature. People react differently under that physiological change, and not always for the better. This provides new information to each of the individuals taking part, and what seemed like a great idea fifteen minutes ago can become repulsive fairly quickly. A good analogy might be: You want to cross the road, and the only car you see is a half-mile away. But as you step out, you realize that car is going faster than you thought, so you decide to wait. Should you be forced to cross anyway, because you initially thought it was safe? Of course not, because you have the freedom to change your mind. And so should women who have previously given consent for sex. And as for the drug and/or alcohol situation:

Wednesday News: Sesame Street, with no muppets

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NC REPUBLICANS WANT POOR KIDS TO HAVE "ONLINE" PRE-K: The state House Education Committee backed legislation on Tuesday that would create a three-year virtual early learning pilot program targeted at preparing at-risk preschool children for kindergarten. Backers of the new program say it will help underserved young children who aren’t able to get into a traditional pre-K program. “The purpose of this program is to deliver a high-quality program, early intervention for those kids so that when they do start school they’re not left in the dust.” But critics say the new program falls short of providing children a real preschool program. ‘It seems so often in the last few years that we’re doing things on the cheap.” Keith Poston, president of the Public School Forum of North Carolina, said in an interview Tuesday.
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/article229142574.html

Tuesday News: Parting is such sweet sorrow...

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DALLAS WOODHOUSE WILL LEAVE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POSITION IN JUNE: The party’s central committee, a group of about 30 people, held an hours-long meeting Sunday night at which it discussed Woodhouse’s future. Early Monday, McClatchy was not able to determine what was decided. The meeting came after the party’s chairman, Robin Hayes, was indicted for allegedly trying to funnel bribe money to N.C. Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey and making false statements to the FBI. Hayes relinquished some of his duties at the NC GOP, appointing Aubrey Woodard as acting chair. Woodhouse wasn’t mentioned in the indictment and says he’s not a target of the investigation. But he testified before the grand jury in December, as McClatchy previously reported. “I am under contract through the convention,” Woodhouse said in a text. “After that, with the election of a new chair, and after four years, a run longer than most, I am moving on. This was always what I had in mind.”
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/article229193954.html

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